Degradation of carbamazepine by Trametes versicolor in an air pulsed fluidized bed bioreactor and identification of intermediates

Aleksandra Jelic, Carles Cruz-Morató, Ernest Marco-Urrea, Monserrat Sarrà, Sandra Perez, Teresa Vicent, Mira Petrović, Damia Barcelo

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    118 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The paper describes the aerobic degradation of carbamazepine (CBZ), an anti-epileptic drug widely found in aquatic environment, from Erlenmeyer flask to bioreactor by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. In Erlenmeyer flask, CBZ at approximately 9mgL-1 was almost completely eliminated (94%) after 6d, while at near environmentally relevant concentrations of 50μgL-1, 61% of the contaminant was degraded in 7d. Acridone, acridine, 10,11-dihydro-10,11-dihydroxy-CBZ, and 10, 11-epoxy-CBZ were identified as major metabolites, confirming the degradation of CBZ. The degradation process was then carried out in an air pulsed fluidized bioreactor operated in batch and continuous mode. Around 96% of CBZ was removed after 2 days in batch mode operation, and 10,11-dihydro-10,11-epoxycarbamazepine was found as unique metabolite. In bioreactor operated in continuous mode with a hydraulic retention time of 3d, 54% of the inflow concentration (approx. 200μgL-1) was reduced at the steady state (25d) with a CBZ degradation rate of 11.9μgCBZg-1 dry weight d-1. No metabolite was detected in the culture broth. Acute toxicity tests (Microtox) indicated that the final culture broth in both batch and continuous mode operation were non toxic, with 15min EC50 values of 24% and 77%, respectively. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)955-964
    JournalWater Research
    Volume46
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Mar 2012

    Keywords

    • Bioreactor
    • Carbamazepine
    • Continuous treatment
    • Pharmaceuticals
    • Trametes versicolor

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