Culex pipiens and Stegomyia albopicta (=Aedes albopictus) populations as vectors for lineage 1 and 2 West Nile virus in Europe

Marco Brustolin, S. Talavera, C. Santamaría, R. Rivas, N. Pujol, C. Aranda, E. Marquès, M. Valle, M. Verdún, N. Pagès, N. Busquets

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    25 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society. The emerging disease West Nile fever is caused by West Nile virus (WNV), one of the most widespread arboviruses. This study represents the first test of the vectorial competence of European Culex pipiens Linnaeus 1758 and Stegomyia albopicta (=Aedes albopictus) (both: Diptera: Culicidae) populations for lineage 1 and 2 WNV isolated in Europe. Culex pipiens and S.albopicta populations were susceptible to WNV infection, had disseminated infection, and were capable of transmitting both WNV lineages. This is the first WNV competence assay to maintain mosquito specimens under environmental conditions mimicking the field (day/night) conditions associated with the period of maximum expected WNV activity. The importance of environmental conditions is discussed and the issue of how previous experiments conducted in fixed high temperatures may have overestimated WNV vector competence results with respect to natural environmental conditions is analysed. The information presented should be useful to policymakers and public health authorities for establishing effective WNV surveillance and vector control programmes. This would improve preparedness to prevent future outbreaks.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)166-173
    JournalMedical and Veterinary Entomology
    Volume30
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2016

    Keywords

    • Aedes albopictus
    • Culex pipiens
    • Environmental conditions
    • FTA cards
    • Stegomyia albopicta
    • Transmission
    • Vector competence
    • West Nile virus

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