Crystal structure of protoporphyrinogen oxidase from Myxococcus xanthus and its complex with the inhibitor acifluorfen

Hazel R. Corradi, Anne V. Corrigall, Ester Boix, C. Gopi Mohan, Edward D. Sturrock, Peter N. Meissner, K. Ravi Acharya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase, a monotopic membrane protein, which catalyzes the oxidation of protoporphyrinogen IX to protoporphyrin IX in the heme/chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway, is distributed widely throughout nature. Here we present the structure of protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase from Myxococcus xanthus, an enzyme with similar catalytic properties to human protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase that also binds the common plant herbicide, acifluorfen. In the native structure, the planar porphyrinogen substrate is mimicked by a Tween 20 molecule, tracing three sides of the macrocycle. In contrast, acifluorfen does not mimic the planarity of the substrate but is accommodated by the shape of the binding pocket and held in place by electrostatic and aromatic interactions. A hydrophobic patch surrounded by positively charged residues suggests the position of the membrane anchor, differing from the one proposed for the tobacco mitochondrial protoporphyrinogen oxidase. Interestingly, there is a discrepancy between the dimerization state of the protein in solution and in the crystal. Conserved structural features are discussed in relation to a number of South African variegate porphyria-causing mutations in the human enzyme. © 2006 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38625-38633
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume281
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Dec 2006

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Crystal structure of protoporphyrinogen oxidase from Myxococcus xanthus and its complex with the inhibitor acifluorfen'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this