Confocal laser scanning microscopy coupled to a spectrofluorometric detector as a rapid tool for determining the in vivo effect of metals on phototrophic bacteria

Mireia Burnat, Elia Diestra, Isabel Esteve, Antonio Solé

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we determine for the first time the in vivo effect of heavy metals in a phototrophic bacterium. We used Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy coupled to a spectrofluorometric detector as a rapid technique to measure pigment response to heavy-metal exposure. To this end, we selected lead and copper (toxic and essential metals) and Microcoleus sp. as the phototrophic bacterium because it would be feasible to see this cyanobacterium as a good biomarker, since it covers large extensions of coastal sediments. The results obtained demonstrate that, while cells are still viable, pigment peak decreases whereas metal concentration increases (from 0.1 to 1 mM Pb). Pigments are totally degraded when cultures were polluted with lead and copper at the maximum doses used (25 mM Pb(NO 3) 2 and 10 mM CuSO 4). The aim of this study was also to identify the place of metal accumulation in Microcoleus cells. Element analysis of this cyanobacterium in the above mentioned conditions determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) coupled to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), shows that Pb (but not Cu) accumulates externally and internally in cells. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-60
JournalBulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Volume84
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010

Keywords

  • Confocal laser scanning microscopy
  • Electron microscopy techniques
  • Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis
  • Heavy metals
  • Microcoleus sp.
  • Spectrofluorometric techniques

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