Complex abdominal wall hernia repair in contaminated surgical fields: Factors affecting the choice of prosthesis

Manuel López-Cano, María Teresa Quiles, José Antonio Pereira, Manuel Armengol-Carrasco, María Antonia Arbós Vía

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To compare patients with complex abdominal wall hernias undergoing surgical repair using synthetic nonabsorbable or biologic meshes in contaminated fields. Retrospective review of 62 patients with complex abdominal wall hernia with surgical repair in an elective setting and in the context of a clean-contaminated or contaminated fields (January 2009-April 2015). Two groups according to the prosthesis (synthetic nonabsorbable, n=48 or biologic, n=14).Mean follow-up was 24.6 (15.8) months. Clean-contaminated wounds were significantly more frequent in the synthetic group. Contaminated wounds were significantly more frequent in the biologic group. Enterocutaneous fistula, recurrent hernia, and removal of chronic infected mesh were significantly more frequently in the biologic group. Differences in postoperative complications and surgical site infections were not found. Recurrence was higher in the biologic group (35.7% vs 8.3%, P=0.03). In the elective repair of complex hernia, the level of contamination, a recurrent hernia, an enterocutaneous fistula or removal of chronic infected mesh were the factors affecting the choice of prosthesis. In the clean-contaminated setting, the use of a synthetic nonabsorbable mesh versus a biologic mesh did not increase the rate of postoperative infections. Recurrences are significantly higher with biologic meshes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)583-590
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume83
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017

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