Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)

D. Moreno-Pérez, A. Andrés Martín, A. Tagarro García, A. Escribano Montaner, J. Figuerola Mulet, J. J. García García, A. Moreno-Galdó, C. Rodrigo Gonzalo De Lliria, J. Saavedra Lozano

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1785
Pages (from-to)217.e1-217.e11
JournalAnales de Pediatria
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2015

Keywords

  • Children
  • Community acquired pneumonia
  • Fibrinolytic therapy
  • Immunocompromised patients
  • Pleural drainage
  • Pleural empyema
  • Underlying conditions
  • Video-assisted thoracoscopy

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