Characterisation of dynamic flow patterns in turbidite reservoirs using 3D outcrop analogues: Example of the Eocene Morillo turbidite system (south-central Pyrenees, Spain)

Richard Labourdette, Philippe Crumeyrolle, Eduard Remacha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Optimum hydrocarbon recovery from clastic reservoirs depends on the depth of our knowledge of the detailed architecture of intercalated shaly baffles and barriers. In the case of deep marine turbidite fields, the usual investigation methods are often unsatisfactory due to a scale gap between seismic and well bore data. This gap can be reduced however, if we have more information concerning the distribution of finer-scale heterogeneities. This paper describes the detailed study and modelling of outcrop analogues from the Eocene Morillo turbidite system (south-central Pyrenees, Spain). The southern margin of the Morillo turbidite system provides evidence of the contact between the uppermost channel storey of the complex and associated sandy overbank wedge deposits. Lithofacies are firstly used to describe heterogeneity distribution. Petrophysical characteristics derived from reservoir analogues are then applied to these lithofacies. The model is flow simulated and two distinct well patterns are tested to evaluate the impact of the different heterogeneity levels encountered in the outcrop. These models significantly increase our understanding of the precise distribution of the inherent heterogeneities at a detailed level previously difficult to achieve. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-270
JournalMarine and Petroleum Geology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2008

Keywords

  • Channel-levee transition
  • Dynamic simulations
  • Eocene
  • High-sinuosity channels
  • Turbidite outcrop analogue

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