Changes in haemostasis in endurance horses: detection by highly sensitive ELISA‐tests

L. MONREAL, ANNA M. ANGLES, M. MONREAL, YVONNE ESPADA, J. MONASTERIO

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exercise induced variations in coagulation and fibrinolytic activities were evaluated in 25 endurance horses competing in a 80 km ride. Venous blood samples were collected before exercise, after 40 km and 30 min after 80 km. Haematological parameters, fibrinogen, clotting times (aPTT and PT) and the main inhibitors (AT‐III and α2‐antiplasmin) activities were determined. Furthermore, we assessed thrombin‐antithrombin complexes (TAT) as a marker of coagulation activity; and fibrinogen degradation products (FgDP) and fibrin degradation products D‐dimers (FbDP) as markers of fibrinolytic activity using immunoenzymatic tests. Significant changes in all haemostatic parameters were found after endurance exercise. A significant (P < 0.001) increase of TAT values was found when comparing pre‐race (mean ± s.d. 2.28 ± 0.9), at 40 km (3.45 ± 1.2) and 30 min after 80 km (4.0 ± 1.9 ng/ml). Values of FgDP before, at 40 km and after 80 km showed a significant (P < 0.0001) decrease (mean ± s.d. 445.0 ± 144.4, 210.0 ± 111.1 and 177.7 ± 77.2 ng/ml) and the values of FbDP showed a slight but significant (P < 0.001) increase (mean ± s.d. 875.4 ± 230.9, 1062.0 ± 310.0 and 737.2 ± 305.3 ng/ml). These changes confirm a hypercoagulable state, a marked hypofibrinogenolysis and a slight hyperfibrinolysis during endurance exercise. No significant differences were found between the results from horses that finished (n / 19) and those eliminated because of fatigue (n = 6). © 1995 EVJ Ltd
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-123
JournalEquine Veterinary Journal
Volume27
Issue number18 S
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1995

Keywords

  • coagulation
  • ELISA‐tests
  • endurance
  • exercise
  • fibrinolysis
  • horse

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