Cellular proliferation in the urorectal septation complex of the human embryo at Carnegie stages 13-18: A nuclear area-based morphometric analysis

Josep Nebot-Cegarra, Pere Jordi Fàbregas, Inma Sánchez-Pérez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to analyse the patterns of cellular proliferation both in the mesenchyme of the urorectal septum (URS) and in the adjacent territories (posterior urogenital mesenchyme, anterior intestinal mesenchyme and cloacal folds mesenchyme), as well as their contribution to the process of cloacal division, a computer-assisted method was used to obtain the nuclear area of 3874 mesenchymal cells from camera lucida drawings of nuclear contours of selected sections of human embryos [Carnegie stages (CSs) 13-18]. Based on changes in the size of the nucleus during the cellular cycle, we considered proliferating cells in each territory to be those with a nuclear area over the 75th percentile. The URS showed increasing cell proliferation, with proliferation patterns that coincided closely with cloacal folds mesenchyme, and with less overall proliferation than urogenital and intestinal mesenchymes. Furthermore, at C5 18, we observed the beginning of the rupture in the cloacal membrane; however, no fusion has been demonstrated either between the URS and the cloacal membrane or between the cloacal folds. The results suggest that cloacal division depends on a morphogenetic complex where the URS adjacent territories could determine septal displacement at the time that their mesenchymes could be partially incorporated within the proliferating URS. © Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2005.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-364
JournalJournal of Anatomy
Volume207
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2005

Keywords

  • Cellular nucleus
  • Cloaca
  • Computer-assisted method
  • Development
  • Urorectal septum

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