Catalan imitations of the ligurian taches noires ware in barcelona (18th-19th century): An example of technical knowledge transfer

Roberta Di Febo, Lluís Casas, Claudio Capelli, Roberto Cabella, Oriol Vallcorba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2018 by the author. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. The ware called Taches Noires was developed in Albisola (Liguria, NW Italy) during the 18th century. In just a few years, it spread all over the Mediterranean (Italy, France, Spain, Tunisia, and Greece) and also in the New World (Canada, the Caribbean Islands, and Mexico). The success of the Taches Noires ware was so massive that it was soon copied by Spanish and French workshops. A collection of Catalan imitations and Ligurian imports found in Barcelona were analysed and compared to previously existing data from Barcelona productions, as well as reference samples from Albisola. The study proved the presence of both local imitations and original Albisola imports. The analysis showed a homogeneous product of high technical quality for the Albisola pottery. On the contrary, the local imitations presented a greater diversification in the choice and manipulation of the raw materials, probably related to the existence of different workshops engaged in the manufacturing of these products. Nevertheless, for one of the local groups, ceramists adopted a glaze recipe similar to the one used in Albisola, clearly indicating a direct transfer of knowledge, and possibly of potters, from Albisola to Barcelona.
Original languageEnglish
Article number183
JournalMinerals
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2018

Keywords

  • 18th century AD
  • Albisola
  • Archaeometric analyses
  • Barcelona
  • Hematite
  • Imitations
  • Kentrolite
  • Provenance
  • Taches noires pottery
  • Technical knowledge

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