Burden of pelvis fracture: A population-based study of incidence, hospitalisation and mortality

D. Prieto-Alhambra, F. F. Avilés, A. Judge, T. Van Staa, X. Nogués, N. K. Arden, A. Díez-Pérez, C. Cooper, M. K. Javaid

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Abstract

Summary: The objective of this study was to describe the incidence and consequences of pelvic fractures in a community cohort. The incidence of pelvic fractures increases with age with a protective effect of higher body mass index. Almost 60% of those with a pelvic fracture required an inpatient stay, with a median of 9 days. There was a higher 3-year mortality in those admitted (17%) vs. those not admitted (6.3%). Given the substantial health burden, further work is required to identify the optimal post-fracture therapeutic strategy to improve outcomes. Introduction: The burden of pelvis fractures is projected to increase, but there is a paucity of community-based studies describing rates, mortality and future fracture risk. We therefore estimated the age, gender and BMI-specific incidence of pelvis fracture in Catalonia (North-East Spain), and assessed hospital stay and mortality following fracture. Methods: The SIDIAPQ database contains validated clinical information from computerised medical records of a representative sample of 30% of the population of Catalonia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study including all subjects aged ≥40 in SIDIAPQ and linked to the regional Hospital Admissions Database from 2007 to 2009. Pelvis fractures were ascertained using ICD-10 codes. Incidence and mortality rates were calculated. Results: A total of 1,118,173 patients (582,820 women) were observed for 3 years and 1,356 had a pelvic fracture. The rate for pelvic fracture was 4.35/10,000 person-years (pyar) [95% CI 4.13-4.59] (men-2.73 [2.48-3.01]; women-5.82 [5.46-6.20]). This increased with age, peaking in those over 90 years: 29.41 [25.74-33.59]. Higher BMI was protective (HR 0.75 per SD BMI; [0.69-0.82]). Moreover, 59.1% of fractured patients were hospitalised with a median (IQR) stay of 9 (5-16) days, and after the 3-year follow-up 13.9% died (mortality rate 10.7/100 pyar [9.3-12.3]) with higher rates in those hospitalised (17.0%). Conclusions: Pelvic fractures are associated with high rates of hospitalisation and mortality. Given this, further work is required to identify the optimal post-fracture therapeutic strategy to improve outcomes in this elderly patient group. © International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2012.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2797-2803
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume23
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2012

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Epidemiology
  • Fractures
  • Mortality
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pelvis

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