Bull island: Characterisation and development of a modern barrier island triggered by human activity in Dublin Bay, Ireland

Sojan Mathew, Xavier M. Pellicer, Silvia Caloca, Xavier Monteys, Mario Zarroca, Diego Jiménez-Martín

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2019, Geographical Society of Ireland. All rights reserved. Bull Island is a 5km long sand spit extending north-eastwards from the North Wall of Dublin Port, and was developed following the construction of the North Wall during the first half of the 19th century. In this investigation, characterisation of hydrostratigraphic units and erosion/accretion rates of the beach dune system was quantified using geomorphological and geophysical data. Depth-to-bedrock and spatial distribution of the major hydrostratigraphic units were estimated from ERT data. GPR data was used to characterise the aeolian sediment thickness and facies associations. It was found that the sediment accumulation in the south-western parts is expressed by low frequency, poorly developed dune ridges of 1-2m height combined with fresh water marshes, evolving north-eastwards into high frequency well-developed sand dunes reaching maximum heights of 9m. DSAS programme aided in estimating the erosion/accretion rates of ca. 3.7m.a-1 in the south-western region, ca. 1.2m.a-1 along the central portion and ca. 3.4m.a-1 along the north-eastern shoreline. The major controls on the evolution of the beach dune system may be ascribable to the sediment supply and hydrodynamic processes in Dublin bay paired with the position of the Dublin Port North Wall.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-100
JournalIrish Geography
Volume52
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Aerial photography
  • Erosion/accretion
  • ERT
  • Foredune
  • Geomorphology
  • GPR
  • Shoreline

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