Brains, language and the argumentative mind in Western and Eastern societies. The fertile differences between Western-Eastern argumentative traditions

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Abstract

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd The philosophical differences between Western and Eastern philosophy not only derive from general cultural ideas about reality, but as Nisbet writes (2003), are also methodological, ontological, and cognitively driven. Thus, we can see that strategies of thought and theory-generation are constrained and enabled by conceptual levels, and that the existence of differences and within these levels may be pragmatically combined in fruitful ways. At this point, I remark that there is not a single way to connect biology and culture, but at least we need to admit that brains allow the existence of minds and that these create languages, which also organize the world symbolically following a long set of (sometimes interconnected) heuristics. Throughout the paper we will see how fundamental, geographically located cultural perspectives have affected reasoning strategies and discourses, determining the main Western and Eastern Traditions. At the same time, we can conclude that different traditional perspectives allow more diversity for knowledge acquisition.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)424-431
JournalProgress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology
Volume131
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Argumentation
  • Cognition
  • Eastern
  • Epistemology
  • Logic
  • Opportunism
  • Pluralism
  • Western

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