Blood pressure in the initial phase of acute ischaemic stroke: Evolution and its role as an independent prognosis factor at discharge and after 3 months of follow-up

Pedro Armario, Montserrat Martín-Baranera, Luis Miguel Ceresuela, Raquel Hernandez Del Rey, Eduardo Iribarnegaray, Sara Pintado, Asunción Avila, Juan Bello, Jose Luis Tovar, José Alvarez-Sabin

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12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. A prospective observational study was aimed at assessing the role of blood pressure (BP) during the first 24 h from stroke onset on the outcome of acute ischaemic stroke. Methods. Subjects admitted within the first 3 h from stroke onset were included. Stroke severity was evaluated with the Canadian Stroke Scale (CSS). Functional recovery was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score ≤2. Results. One hundred subjects were included. In a logistic regression model, the independent predictors of poor functional recovery at discharge were: age (OR=1.12; 95% CI 1.04-1.21; p=0.0033), non-lacunar stroke subtype (OR=4.31; 95% CI 1.07-17.31; p=0.0395), diabetes mellitus (OR=8.38; 95% CI 1.67-41.95; p=0.0097), a CSS score at admission ≤8 (OR=28.64; 95% CI 5.59-146.68; p < 0.0001), an average systolic BP during the first 6 h ≥180 mmHg (OR=13.34; 95% CI 1.34-133.10; p=0.0272) and a lower diastolic BP average from 6 to 24 h (OR for 5 mmHg increase: 0.57; CI 95% 0.36-0.88; p=0.0115). Similar results were observed after 3 months of follow-up. Conclusion. In ischaemic stroke patients, systolic BP over 180 mmHg in the first 6 h and a decrease of diastolic BP during the 6-24 h from stroke onset were independent predictors of a poor functional recovery.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)284-290
JournalBlood Pressure
Volume17
Issue number5-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2008

Keywords

  • Acute stroke
  • Hypertension
  • Prognosis

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