Benefits of minocycline and rifampin-impregnated central venous catheters: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled, multicenter trial

Cristóbal León, Sergio Ruiz-Santana, Jordi Rello, Maria V. De La Torre, Jordi Vallés, Francisco Álvarez-Lerma, Rafael Sierra, Pedro Saavedra, Francisco Álvarez-Salgado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the efficacy of minocycline and rifampin-impregnated catheters compared to non-impregnated catheters in critically ill patients. Design: Prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled, multicenter trial. Setting: Intensive care units of seven acute-care teaching hospitals in Spain. Patients: Intensive care unit patients requiring triple-lumen central venous catheter for more than 3 days. Interventions: At catheter insertion, 228 patients were randomized to minocycline and rifampin-impregnated catheters and 237 to non-impregnated catheters. Skin, catheter tip, subcutaneous segment, hub cultures, peripheral blood and infusate cultures were performed at catheter withdrawal. The rate of colonization, catheter-related blood-stream infection (CRBSI) and catheter-related clinical infectious complications (purulence at the insertion site or CRBSI) were assessed. Measurements and main results: In the intention-to-treat analysis (primary analysis), the episodes per 1000 catheter days of clinical infectious complications decreased from 8.6 to 5.7 (RR =0.67, 95% CI 0.31-1.44), CRBSI from 5.9 to 3.1 (RR =0.53, 95% CI 0.2-1.44) and tip colonization from 24 to 10.4 (RR =0.43, 95% CI 0.26-0.73). Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters were associated with a significant decrease of coagulase-negative staphylococci colonization (RR =0.24, 95% CI 0.13-0.45) and a significant increase of Candida spp. colonization (RR =5.84, 95% CI 1.31-26.1). Conclusions: The use of antimicrobial-impregnated catheters was associated with a significantly lower rate of coagulase-negative staphylococci colonization and a significant increase in Candida spp. colonization, although a decrease in CRBSI, increase in 30-day survival or reduced length of stay was not observed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1891-1899
JournalIntensive Care Medicine
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2004

Keywords

  • Bloodstream infection
  • Central venous catheters
  • Clinical infectious complications
  • Minocycline and rifampin-impregnated catheters
  • Non-impregnated catheters
  • Rate of colonization

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Benefits of minocycline and rifampin-impregnated central venous catheters: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled, multicenter trial'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    León, C., Ruiz-Santana, S., Rello, J., De La Torre, M. V., Vallés, J., Álvarez-Lerma, F., Sierra, R., Saavedra, P., & Álvarez-Salgado, F. (2004). Benefits of minocycline and rifampin-impregnated central venous catheters: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled, multicenter trial. Intensive Care Medicine, 30(10), 1891-1899. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00134-004-2378-2