Bedside evaluation of pressure-volume curves in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

Lluis Blanch, Josefina López-Aguilar, Ana Villagrá

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe the physiologic and diagnostic utility of static pressure-volume curves of the respiratory system at the bedside in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. RECENT FINDINGS: The pressure-volume curve of the respiratory system is a useful tool for the measurement of respiratory system mechanics in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The pressure-volume curve has a sigmoid shape, with lower and upper points on the inspiratory limb and a point of maximum curvature on the expiratory limb. Visual and mathematical pressure-volume curve analysis may be useful for understanding individual lung mechanics and for selecting ventilator settings. Among the different techniques for acquiring pressure-volume curves at the bedside, the constant slow flow method is the simplest to perform, the most clinically reliable and has the fewest limitations. SUMMARY: Measurement of pressure-volume curves at the bedside in critically ill patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome should be considered a useful respiratory monitoring tool to assess physiologic lung status and to adjust ventilator settings, when appropriate, to minimize superimposed lung injury associated with mechanical ventilators. © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)332-337
    JournalCurrent Opinion in Critical Care
    Volume13
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2007

    Keywords

    • Acute lung injury
    • Lung mechanics
    • Mechanical ventilation
    • Pressure-volume curve

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Bedside evaluation of pressure-volume curves in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this