Associations between neural injury markers of intrauterine growth-restricted infants and neurodevelopment at 2 years of age

E. Mazarico, E. Llurba, L. Cabero, O. Sánchez, A. Valls, A. Martín-Ancel, D. Cardenas, M. D. Gómez Roig

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Abstract

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between brain injury biomarkers in intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) infants (S100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE)) and neurodevelopment at 2 years of age. Methods: This prospective case-control study was a cooperative effort among Spanish Maternal and Child Health Network (Retic SAMID) hospitals. At inclusion, biometry for estimated fetal weight and feto-placental Doppler variables were measured for each infant. Maternal venous blood and fetal umbilical arterial blood samples were collected at the time of delivery and neural injury markers S100B and NSE concentrations were measured. Neurodevelopment was evaluated at 2 years of age using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, third edition (Bayley-III). Results: Fifty six pregnancies were included. Thirty-one infants were classified as IUGR and 25 as non-IUGR. Neurodevelopmental evaluation at 2 years of age indicated that there were no between-group differences for any of the tests. For all patients in both groups, we found statistically significant inverse relationships between the concentrations of NSE in the cord blood and the results of the cognitive test (r = −271, p =.042), fine motor subtest (r = −280, p =.036), and social-emotional test (r = −349, p =.015). We also found statistically significant differences between the concentrations of S100B in the cord blood and the results of the cognitive test (r = −306, p =.022) and expressive communication subtest (r = −304, p =.023). For the IUGR group, we found a significant inverse relationship between the concentrations of S100B in the maternal serum and the results of adaptive behavior test (p <.05). In the non-IUGR group, we found statistically significant inverse relationships between the concentration of NSE in the cord blood and the results of the fine motor subtest (r = −446, p =.025) and social-emotional test (r = −489, p =.021). The difference between the concentration of S100B in the cord blood and the language composite score was also statistically significant (p =.038). Conclusions: At 2 years of age, the concentrations of NSE and S100B were higher in the non-IUGR and IUGR groups with the worst scores for some areas of neurodevelopmental evaluation. The value of these biomarkers for prognostic neurodevelopmental use requires further investigation for both non-IUGR and IUGR infants.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3197-3203
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Oct 2019

Keywords

  • Intrauterine growth restriction
  • neural injury markers
  • neurodevelopment
  • neuron-specific enolase
  • S100B

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