Association between first-year virological response to raltegravir and long-term outcomes in treatment-experienced patients with HIV-1 infection

Joseph J. Eron, David A. Cooper, Roy T. Steigbigel, Bonaventura Clotet, Patrick Yeni, Kim M. Strohmaier, Anthony J. Rodgers, Richard J. Barnard, Bach Yen T. Nguyen, Hedy Teppler

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

©2015 International Medical Press. Background: We explored the relationship between virological response in the first year of treatment and long-term outcomes in the BENCHMRK studies. Methods: Patients failing antiretroviral treatment with 3-class resistant HIV-1 received double-blinded raltegravir (or placebo) with optimized background therapy (OBT) until week 156, followed by open-label raltegravir with OBT up to week 240. In this exploratory analysis of patients randomized to raltegravir, virological response over weeks 16-48 was categorized as continuous suppression (CS; viral RNA [vRNA] always <50 copies/ml), low-level viraemia (LLV; vRNA always <400 copies/ml, >50 copies/ml at least once), or not suppressed (NS; vRNA ≥400 copies/ml at least once). The association between these first-year vRNA response categories and baseline factors was analysed with univariate and multivariate models. Virological and immunological outcomes for years 2-5 were assessed by first-year vRNA response category (observed failure approach). Results: Baseline vRNA, baseline CD4<sup>+</sup> T-cell count and rapid viral decay (vRNA <50 copies/ml between weeks 2-12) correlated with first-year vRNA response (P<0.001); only rapid viral decay remained significant by multiple regression. Virological response rates were similar in the LLV and CS groups and lowest in the NS group. CD4<sup>+</sup> T-cell count increased through week 240 in the CS and LLV groups. Time to loss of virological response (confirmed vRNA ≥400 copies/ml) through week 240 did not support as strong a difference between the LLV and CS groups (log-rank P=0.11) as previously reported through weeks 156 and 192 (P<0.05). Conclusions: Treatment-experienced patients on a raltegravir-based regimen with early LLV may have long-term virological and immunological benefit when their therapy is maintained.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-315
JournalAntiviral Therapy
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

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