Assessment of inducible myocardial ischemia, quality of life, and functional status after successful percutaneous revascularization in patients with chronic total coronary occlusion

Xavier Rossello, Sandra Pujadas, Antoni Serra, Ester Bajo, Francesc Carreras, Antonio Barros, Juan Cinca, Guillermo Pons-Lladó, Beatriz Vaquerizo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. The benefits of chronic total coronary occlusion (CTO) revascularization are not well established. In this prospective cohort study, 47 consecutive patients with successful percutaneous recanalization of CTO underwent adenosine stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), 6-minute walk test (6MWT), and the Short Form-36 Health Survey before and 6 months after the procedure. Successful recanalization of a CTO was followed by significant improvement of (1) global physical and mental health status; (2) the distance walked in the 6MWT; (3) the incidence of chest pain at the end of the 6MWT; and (4) the score of a novel CMR ischemic burden index on the basis of the characteristics of adenosine stress perfusion defects (extension, persistence, transmurality, and induced contractile regional dysfunction). Patients with greater CMR ischemic index before percutaneous revascularization showed better improvement in the 6MWT. In conclusion, successful recanalization of a CTO leads to a concurrent improvement in ischemic burden, exercise tolerance, angina frequency, and quality of life scores. Patients with a high ischemic CMR score before CTO recanalization showed the better improvement in exercise tolerance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)720-726
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume117
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2016

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