Are there really low-barrier hydrogen bonds in proteins? the case of photoactive yellow protein

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Abstract

For a long time, low-barrier hydrogen bonds (LBHBs) have been proposed to exist in many enzymes and to play an important role in their catalytic function, but the proof of their existence has been elusive. The transient formation of an LBHB in a protein system has been detected for the first time using neutron diffraction techniques on a photoactive yellow protein (PYP) crystal in a study published in 2009 (Yamaguchi, S.; et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2009, 106, 440-444). However, very recent theoretical studies based on electronic structure calculations and NMR resonance experiments on PYP in solution (Saito, K.; et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2012, 109, 167-172) strongly indicate that there is not such an LBHB. By means of electronic structure calculations combined with the solution of the nuclear Schrödinger equation, we analyze here under which conditions an LBHB can exist in PYP, thus leading to a more reasonable and conciliating understanding of the above-mentioned studies. © 2014 American Chemical Society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3542-3552
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume136
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Mar 2014

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