Are bacterial growth and/or chemotaxis increased by filler injections? Implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of filler-related granulomas

Jaume Alijotas-Reig, Francesc Miró-Mur, Irene Planells-Romeu, Natalia Garcia-Aranda, Victor Garcia-Gimenez, Miquel Vilardell-Tarrés

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: As microbial agents have been associated with late adverse effects related to fillers antibiotic treatment has been envisaged. Objective: To determine whether biomaterials favor bacterial growth and/or attract bacteria. Methods: Hyaluronic acid, semi-permanent fillers, such as calcium hydroxylapatite, and permanent fillers, such as polyalkylimide/polyacrylamide, were used. Experiments were performed with Escherichia coli, strain HVH-U47. Bacteria were transferred to Sven-Gard agar to test mobility. Striae of this bacterial strain with a MacFarland 1 turbulence pattern were seeded from a spot of inoculated biomaterial using Müller-Hinton medium. The chemoattractive properties of the biomaterials were analyzed 10 days after inoculation. Bacterial growth over the biomaterial and in-depth growth were assessed as well. Results: Semi-permanent fillers did not stimulate bacterial growth but they allowed bacterial colonization over the filler. Permanent acrylic compounds neither presented chemoattractant properties nor showed bacterial growth over the biomaterial. Similar results were obtained when performing in-depth cultures. Conclusions: Permanent and semi-permanent fillers did not facilitate bacterial growth when flagellated E. coli HVH-U47 was used. Our results do not argue in favor of antibiotics as the mainstay of therapy in late granulomas related to permanent fillers. In the case of resorbable/semi-permanent fillers, more studies are needed before recommending antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)356-364
JournalDermatology
Volume221
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2010

Keywords

  • Bacterial infection
  • Chemotaxis
  • Filler injections
  • Granulomas
  • Treatment

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