Ant exclusion in citrus over an 8-year period reveals a pervasive yet changing effect of ants on a Mediterranean spider assemblage

L. Mestre, J. Piñol, J. A. Barrientos, X. Espadaler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ants and spiders are ubiquitous generalist predators that exert top-down control on herbivore populations. Research shows that intraguild interactions between ants and spiders can negatively affect spider populations, but there is a lack of long-term research documenting the strength of such interactions and the potentially different effects of ants on the diverse array of species in a spider assemblage. Similarly, the suitability of family-level surrogates for finding patterns revealed by species-level data (taxonomic sufficiency) has almost never been tested in spider assemblages. We present a long-term study in which we tested the impact of ants on the spider assemblage of a Mediterranean citrus grove by performing sequential 1-year experimental exclusions on tree canopies for 8 years. We found that ants had a widespread influence on the spider assemblage, although the effect was only evident in the last 5 years of the study. During those years, ants negatively affected many spiders, and effects were especially strong for sedentary spiders. Analyses at the family level also detected assemblage differences between treatments, but they concealed the different responses to ant exclusion shown by some related spider species. Our findings show that the effects of experimental manipulations in ecology can vary greatly over time and highlight the need for long-term studies to document species interactions. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-248
JournalOecologia
Volume173
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2013

Keywords

  • Agroecosystem
  • Ant exclusion
  • Competition
  • Intraguild interactions
  • Taxonomic resolution

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