Ann Cook versus Hannah Glasse: Gender, professionalism and readership in the eighteenth-century cookbook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

Abstract

© 2018 British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies. Ann Cook’s Professed Cookery (1760) contains a vitriolic attack on the most celebrated cookery book of the eighteenth century, Hannah Glasse’s The Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy (1747). In addition to analysing this conflict, this article also explores Cook’s previously unobserved ‘A Plan of House-Keeping’, which depicts a utopian vision of housekeeping based on a partly real but largely imagined sorority. It concludes that throughout her writing Cook could not conceive that a cookbook might be read by those not requiring instruction.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-191
Number of pages17
JournalJournal for Eighteenth-Century Studies
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • Ann Cook
  • Cookbooks
  • Domestic management
  • Food history
  • Gender
  • Hannah Glasse

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ann Cook versus Hannah Glasse: Gender, professionalism and readership in the eighteenth-century cookbook'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this