An ultrasound study of contextual and syllabic effects in consonant sequences produced under heavy articulatory constraint conditions

Daniel Recasens, Clara Rodríguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. The present ultrasound study investigates lingual coarticulatory resistance and differences in tongue configuration and contextual variability for consonants in syllable onset vs coda position in Catalan /iC#Ci/ sequences. In agreement with comparable ultrasound data for /aC#Ca/ sequences reported in an earlier study, coarticulatory resistance turned out to be less for /r/ (which is realized as a trill in onset position and exhibits a more tap-like realization in coda position), /l/ (which is not strongly dark), /s/ and the alveolopalatal /ɲ/ than for /p, t, n, k/. As expected, contextual variability was less for /iC#Ci/ than for /aC#Ca/ sequences due to the highly demanding requirements put on the tongue body by the high front vowel. Regarding the syllable-position-dependent differences, consonants were often longer but not less variable articulatorily in syllable initial than syllable final position. Syllable-position differences in lingual configuration could be ascribed to either a trend for consonants to be more prominent in onset vs coda position or to prominent coarticulatory effects from flanking /i/ rather than from the contextual consonant in the cluster. The conclusion is drawn that the reason why consonants may sound more reduced in coda vs onset position in heterosyllabic clusters is due less to their actual lingual configuration than to their being manifestly shorter and to specific production characteristics which depend not only on the upper articulators but on the jaw cycle as well.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-52
JournalSpeech Communication
Volume105
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • Coarticulatory resistance
  • Heterosyllabic consonant sequences
  • Syllable-onset and syllable-coda positions
  • Ultrasound

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