An orthopoxvirus-based vaccine reduces virus excretion after MERS-CoV infection in dromedary camels

Bart L. Haagmans, Judith M.A. Van Den Brand, V. Stalin Raj, Asisa Volz, Peter Wohlsein, Saskia L. Smits, Debby Schipper, Theo M. Bestebroer, Nisreen Okba, Robert Fux, Albert Bensaid, David Solanes Foz, Thijs Kuiken, Wolfgang Baumgärtner, Joaquim Segalés, Gerd Sutter, Albert D.M.E. Osterhaus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

163 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections have led to an ongoing outbreak in humans, which was fueled by multiple zoonotic MERS-CoV introductions from dromedary camels. In addition to the implementation of hygiene measures to limit further camel-to-human and human-to-human transmissions, vaccine-mediated reduction of MERS-CoV spread from the animal reservoir may be envisaged. Here we show that a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vaccine expressing the MERS-CoV spike protein confers mucosal immunity in dromedary camels. Compared with results for control animals, we observed a significant reduction of excreted infectious virus and viral RNA transcripts in vaccinated animals upon MERS-CoV challenge. Protection correlated with the presence of serum neutralizing antibodies to MERS-CoV. Induction of MVA-specific antibodies that cross-neutralize camelpox virus would also provide protection against camelpox.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-81
JournalScience
Volume351
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'An orthopoxvirus-based vaccine reduces virus excretion after MERS-CoV infection in dromedary camels'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this