Alteration of liver and muscle fatty acid composition in gilthead seabream “Sparus aurata” juveniles held at high stocking density and fed an essential fatty acid deficient diet

D. Montero, L. E. Robaina, J. Socorro, J. M. Vergara, L. Tort, M. S. Izquierdo

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    Abstract

    The aim of the present study was to determine the combined effect of both stress and EFA deficiency on several biological and biochemical parameters. Fish were fed during 15 weeks two isocaloric and isoproteic diets: a control diet based on fish oil and formulated to meet the n-3 HUFA requirements for this species “1.5% of n-3 HUFA” and a deficient diet containing beef tallow and formulated to be deficient in n-3 HUFA. Each experimental diet was evaluated both at high and low stocking densities “10 and 3.2 kg m-3 of initial density, respectively”. High stocking density produced a chronic stress situation with elevation of plasma cortisol levels. It also caused a reduction in hepatosomatic index and liver lipid contents, increasing the oleic acid/n-3 HUFA ratios in the polar lipids. Fish fed the EFA deficient diet at low stocking density showed common deficiency symptoms. High stocking density in fish fed the EFA deficient diet induced a higher degree of EFA deficiency symptoms leading to mortality, liver steatosis, liver lipid deposition, reduced muscle lipid and reduced n-3 HUFA contents, which particularly affected EPA, but not DHA, suggesting a preferential retention of the latter fatty acid, specially in the phosphoglycerides fraction.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)63-72
    JournalFish Physiology and Biochemistry
    Volume24
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

    Keywords

    • DHA
    • Sparus aurata
    • Stocking density
    • Stress
    • n-3 HUFA

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