Aggregation as bacterial inclusion bodies does not imply inactivation of enzymes and fluorescent proteins

Elena García-Fruitós, Nuria González-Montalbán, Montse Morell, Andrea Vera, Rosa María Ferraz, Anna Arís, Salvador Ventura, Antonio Villaverde

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213 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Many enzymes of industrial interest are not in the market since they are bioproduced as bacterial inclusion bodies, believed to be biologically inert aggregates of insoluble protein. Results: By using two structurally and functionally different model enzymes and two fluorescent proteins we show that physiological aggregation in bacteria might only result in a moderate loss of biological activity and that inclusion bodies can be used in reaction mixtures for efficient catalysis. Conclusion: This observation offers promising possibilities for the exploration of inclusion bodies as catalysts for industrial purposes, without any previous protein-refolding step. © 2005 Garcïa-Fruitós et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Article number27
JournalMicrobial Cell Factories
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Sep 2005

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