Adherence and Satisfaction of Smartphone- and Smartwatch-Based Remote Active Testing and Passive Monitoring in People With Multiple Sclerosis: Nonrandomized Interventional Feasibility Study

Luciana Midaglia, Patricia Mulero, Xavier Montalban, Jennifer Graves, Stephen L. Hauser, Laura Julian, Michael Baker, Jan Schadrack, Christian Gossens, Alf Scotland, Florian Lipsmeier, Johan van Beek, Corrado Bernasconi, Shibeshih Belachew, Michael Lindemann

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

©Luciana Midaglia, Patricia Mulero, Xavier Montalban, Jennifer Graves, Stephen L Hauser, Laura Julian, Michael Baker, Jan Schadrack, Christian Gossens, Alf Scotland, Florian Lipsmeier, Johan van Beek, Corrado Bernasconi, Shibeshih Belachew, Michael Lindemann. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 30.08.2019. BACKGROUND: Current clinical assessments of people with multiple sclerosis are episodic and may miss critical features of functional fluctuations between visits. OBJECTIVE: The goal of the research was to assess the feasibility of remote active testing and passive monitoring using smartphones and smartwatch technology in persosns with multiple sclerosis with respect to adherence and satisfaction with the FLOODLIGHT test battery. METHODS: Persons with multiple sclerosis (aged 20 to 57 years; Expanded Disability Status Scale 0-5.5; n=76) and healthy controls (n=25) performed the FLOODLIGHT test battery, comprising active tests (daily, weekly, every two weeks, or on demand) and passive monitoring (sensor-based gait and mobility) for 24 weeks using a smartphone and smartwatch. The primary analysis assessed adherence (proportion of weeks with at least 3 days of completed testing and 4 hours per day passive monitoring) and questionnaire-based satisfaction. In-clinic assessments (clinical and magnetic resonance imaging) were performed. RESULTS: Persons with multiple sclerosis showed 70% (16.68/24 weeks) adherence to active tests and 79% (18.89/24 weeks) to passive monitoring; satisfaction score was on average 73.7 out of 100. Neither adherence nor satisfaction was associated with specific population characteristics. Test-battery assessments had an at least acceptable impact on daily activities in over 80% (61/72) of persons with multiple sclerosis. CONCLUSIONS: Persons with multiple sclerosis were engaged and satisfied with the FLOODLIGHT test battery. FLOODLIGHT sensor-based measures may enable continuous assessment of multiple sclerosis disease in clinical trials and real-world settings. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02952911; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02952911.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e14863
JournalJournal of Medical Internet Research
Volume21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Aug 2019

Keywords

  • mobile phone
  • multiple sclerosis
  • patient adherence
  • patient satisfaction
  • smartphone
  • wearable electronic devices

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