Additional data in support of the quadruplicated white-ivory reversion system to test for somatic genotoxicity in Drosophila melanogaster

N. Xamena, A. Egido, A. Velázquez, A. Creus, R. Marcos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cyclophosphamide, ethyl methanesulfonate, propyleneimine and tritiated water were tested in a new short-term somatic mutation bioassay, previously described by Green and coworkers (1986), to evaluate the suitability of the quadruplicated white-ivory system of Drosophila melanogaster for genotoxicity testing of chemicals. A 2.9-kb tandemly duplicated sequence of w+ within a w+ gene is responsible for the white-ivory phenotype. Reversion of wi to w+ is in general, associated with the loss of the appended 2.9 kb or other alterations affecting this duplicated region. The appearance of light (white or nearly white) phenotypes could be due to the loss of some wi copies. Thus, in the eyes of adult males resulting from treated larvae, we can detect 2 types of sectors (red and light) on the orange-yellow background. Our results indicate that the genetic system used in this somatic assay is sensitive to the genotoxic effects of the 4 compounds tested. All 4 compounds tested were positive. Tritiated water had weak effects, cyclophosphamide was characterized by small revertant clones and ethyl methanesulfonate and propyleneimine by large clone size. From the available data, we feel that the wi system can be considered of potential value for genotoxicity testing. © 1991.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)305-312
JournalMutation Research/Environmental Mutagenesis and Related Subjects
Volume252
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1991

Keywords

  • Drosophila melanogaster
  • Genotoxicity testing
  • Quadruplicated white-ivory genetic system
  • Somatic mutation assay

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