Adaptation of the AFLP technique as a new tool to detect genetic instability and transposition in interspecific hybrids

Doris Vela, María Pilar García Guerreiro, Antonio Fontdevila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An adapted amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) protocol is presented for detection of hybrid instability in the genome of interspecific hybrids between Drosophila buzzatii and D. koepferae species. Analyses of 15 AFLP instability markers (new bands detected in hybrids) show that up to 81% are the result of transposable element (TE) activity. Twenty TEs associated with AFLP instability markers have been detected by this method in backcross hybrids and segmental hybrids, demonstrating its validity in detecting transposition events occurring during the hybridization process. New insertions of Helena TE have been observed in the hybrid genome after hybridization of the TGTCG22 instability marker by FISH. The AFLP marker technique proved to be an efficient method that improves upon traditional and bioinformatic tools previously used to detect TE mobilization. This newly adapted AFLP protocol may also be applied to a large number of organisms outside the Drosophila genus, making it of interest to evolutionary and population genetic researchers working with species where the knowledge of the genome is scarce.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-250
JournalBioTechniques
Volume50
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2011

Keywords

  • AFLP
  • Drosophila
  • FISH
  • Instability markers
  • Interspecific hybrids
  • Transposition

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