Acute myocardial infarction population incidence and in-hospital management factors associated to 28-day case-fatality in the 65 year and older

Jaume Marrugat, Joan Sala, Josep Masia Manresa, Miguel Gill, Roberto Elosua, Gloria Pérez, Xavier Albert, Araceli Pena, Rafael Masiá

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17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objectives: The myocardial infarction (MI) incidence rate, prognosis and hospitalisation rate in the population 65 and over are rarely studied. We sought to determine MI hospitalisation and incidence rates, and 28-day case-fatality, in the 65 year and older population, and to analyse whether their management and prognosis differed from that of younger patients. Methods: All residents in Gerona (Spain) older than 24 years with suspected fatal or non-fatal MI were investigated and included in a population registry. Results: MI mortality, incidence, and case-fatality dramatically increased with age after 64. Smoking, thrombolysis, antiplatelet and betablocker drug use, coronary angiograms, and coronary revascularisation decreased with age. The risk of death of patients between 75 and 84 years (OR: 4.15, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.70-10.15) and between 85 and 94 years (OR: 4.68, 95% CI: 1.62-13.52) was higher than in the 34-64 years age group, independently of any patient characteristic. Conclusions: The magnitude of the impact of MI in the elderly at population and hospital levels is substantially higher than in those younger than 65 years of age. After this age patients receive less treatments and procedures than their younger counterparts.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-237
JournalEuropean Journal of Epidemiology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Apr 2004

Keywords

  • Case-fatality
  • Coronary disease
  • Elderly
  • Incidence
  • Mortality
  • Myocardial infarction

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