Acute effects of small changes in bicycle saddle height on gross efficiency and lower limb kinematics

Ventura Ferrer-Roca, Raúl Bescos, Andreu Roig, Piero Galilea, Oliver Valero, Juan García-López

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ferrer-Roca, V, Bescó s, R, Roig, A, Galilea, P, Valero, O and Garcý́a-Ló pez, J. Acute effects of small changes in bicycle saddle height on gross efficiency and lower limb kinematics. J Strength Cond Res 28(3): 784-791, 2014-The aim of the present study was to assess the acute effects of small changes in bicycle saddle height on gross efficiency (GE) and lowerlimb kinematics. Well-trained cyclists (n = 14) performed a submaximal pedaling test (∼70-75% of the v-O2max) at constant cadence (90 rpm). It consisted of 3 randomized sets of 6 minutes with the preferred saddle height, 2% higher and 2% lower. Gross efficiency was significantly lower and oxygen consumption (vO2) was significantly higher when raising the saddle (GE = 19.9 ± 1.5%; VO2max = 43.8 ml.kg-1.min -1) than when lowering it (GE = 20.4 ± 1.3%; VO2 = 42.8 ml.kg-1.min-1). Additionally, a change of 0.8% in GE (20.6 ± 1.6% to 19.8 ± 1.6%, p ≤ 0.05) was observed when comparing the positions where the best and worst GE was obtained. A significant effect of the small changes in saddle height on lower limb kinematics was also observed (p , 0.05). The differences between lower and higher saddle positions, in hip, knee, and ankle joints were an increase of extension (∼ 4, 7, and 88, respectively), a decrease of flexion (≃3, 4, and 48, respectively) and, consequently, an increase of the range of movement (≃1, 3, and 48, respectively). The results of the present study indicate that small changes in saddle height affected GE and lower limb kinematics The observed changes in lower limb kinematics could justify, in part, the GE changes. Further research should evaluate longterm effects of these small modifications in the seat height on GE and lower limb kinematics. © 2014 National Strength and Conditioning Association.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)784-791
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Bike fitting
  • Cycling
  • Pedaling efficiency
  • Seat height

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Acute effects of small changes in bicycle saddle height on gross efficiency and lower limb kinematics'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this