Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a descriptive study and analysis of survival in 73 cases

R. Miralles, J. M. Garcés, M. Gallén, J. Gutiérrez-Cebollada, J. Torné, J. L. López-Colomés, H. Yazbeck, F. Prats

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The clinical features and prognostic factors influencing survival in 73 patients diagnosed of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) from June 1984 to November 1988 were evaluated. Mean age was 32 years. The predominant risk group were drug abusers (67%). The most common opportunistic infections were extrapulmonary tuberculosis and esophageal candidiasis. After 6 months, with 42 patients followed up, the probability of survival was 69% +/- 11 (95% confidence interval); after 12 months, with 28 patients, it was 65% +/- 12 (95% confidence interval); and after 18 months, with 11 patients, it was 54% +/- 15 (95% confidence interval). Patients younger than 30 years and those with extrapulmonary tuberculosis had a longer survival than the rest (p = 0.046 and p = 0.014, respectively). The remaining evaluated variables did not have any influence on survival.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-405
JournalMedicina clinica
Volume94
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 24 Mar 1990

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