Acculturative stress as a risk factor of depression and anxiety in the Latin American immigrant population

Hilda Wara Revollo, Adil Qureshi, Francisco Collazos, Sergi Valero, Miguel Casas

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63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores acculturative stress as a risk factor for depressive and anxiety disorders as well as their symptomatology. It is hypothesized that perceived discrimination and general psychosocial stress will show the greatest association with psychopathology. The sample consists of 414 Latin American immigrant primary care patients in Barcelona. The instruments used are: the Barcelona Immigration Stress Scale (BISS) to evaluate acculturative stress, the Goldberg Anxiety and Depression Scale (GADS) for anxiety and depression symptoms, the Mini International Neurological Interview (MINI), a semi-structured interview, to detect psychiatric pathology, and a questionnaire for sociodemographic and attitudinal characteristics. The most elevated levels of acculturative stress were observed in the factors homesickness and general psychosocial stress. Acculturative stress is associated with depression and anxiety. With the covariants controlled, intercultural contact stress and general psychosocial stress maintain the relationship. Acculturative stress constitutes a risk factor for both depression and anxiety. General psychosocial stress and intercultural contact stress are related to psychopathology. Perceived discrimination and homesickness are not associated with psychopathology in the Spanish context, suggesting that cultural congruity plays a key role in the relationship between immigration and mental health. © 2011 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-92
JournalInternational Review of Psychiatry
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2011

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