A social analysis of the bioinvasions of Dreissena polymorpha in Spain and Hydrilla verticillata in Guatemala

Rosa Binimelis, Iliana Monterroso, Beatriz Rodríguez-Labajos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human agency plays a key role in the processes of biological invasions. This comprises not only the human role in the configuration of driving forces or in the perception of the impacts, but also the conceptualization of alien species themselves as an environmental problem. This paper examines different stakeholders' positions in bioinvasion processes at different scales, and it looks at their relevance for the management of invasive species. It compares two cases: the invasion process of Dreissena polymorpha in the Ebro River in Spain and the case of Hydrilla verticillata in Lake Izabal, Guatemala. Our results are structured according to impacts and to management options. The discussion focuses on the relevance of incorporating the different stakeholders' interests and values in the analysis and management of biological invasions. Although social analysis of stakeholders' positions is necessary in order to foster management actions, it also reveals conflicts on the relevant criteria and on the very definition of invasive species. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)555-566
JournalEnvironmental Management
Volume40
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2007

Keywords

  • Biodiversity conservation
  • Dreissena polymorpha
  • Ebro River
  • Hydrilla verticillata
  • Invasive species
  • Lake Izabal
  • Social analysis
  • Stakeholders

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