A review on anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic wastes: Pretreatments and operational conditions

Tahseen Sayara, Antoni Sánchez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Anaerobic digestion (AD) has become extremely popular in the last years to treat and valorize organic wastes both at laboratory and industrial scales, for a wide range of highly produced organic wastes: municipal wastes, wastewater sludge, manure, agrowastes, food industry residuals, etc. Although the principles of AD are well known, it is very important to highlight that knowing the biochemical composition of waste is crucial in order to know its anaerobic biodegradability, which makes an AD process economically feasible. In this paper, we review the main principles of AD, moving to the specific features of lignocellulosic wastes, especially regarding the pretreatments that can enhance the biogas production of such wastes. The main point to consider is that lignocellulosic wastes are present in any organic wastes, and sometimes are the major fraction. Therefore, improving their AD could cause a boost in the development in this technology. The conclusions are that there is no unique strategy to improve the anaerobic biodegradability of lignocellulosic wastes, but pretreatments and codigestion both have an important role on this issue.
Original languageEnglish
Article number4655
Number of pages23
JournalApplied Sciences (Switzerland)
Volume9
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2019

Keywords

  • AD systems
  • AMMONIA INHIBITION
  • BIOLOGICAL PRETREATMENT
  • CATTLE MANURE
  • CO-DIGESTION
  • ENHANCING BIOGAS PRODUCTION
  • FOOD WASTE
  • METHANE YIELD
  • MUNICIPAL SOLID-WASTE
  • ORGANIC FRACTION
  • THERMAL PRETREATMENT
  • codigestion
  • feedstock and degradation pathway
  • pretreatment technologies
  • process stability

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