A DNA vaccine encoding foot-and-mouth disease virus B and T-cell epitopes targeted to class II swine leukocyte antigens protects pigs against viral challenge

Belén Borrego, Jordi M. Argilaguet, Eva Pérez-Martín, Javier Dominguez, Mariano Pérez-Filgueira, José M. Escribano, Francisco Sobrino, Fernando Rodriguez

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Development of efficient and safer vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a must. Previous results obtained in our laboratory have demonstrated that DNA vaccines encoding B and T cell epitopes from type C FMDV, efficiently controlled virus replication in mice, while they did not protect against FMDV challenge in pigs, one of the FMDV natural hosts. The main finding of this work is the ability to improve the protection afforded in swine using a new DNA-vaccine prototype (pCMV-APCH1BTT), encoding FMDV B and T-cell epitopes fused to the single-chain variable fragment of the 1F12 mouse monoclonal antibody that recognizes Class-II Swine Leukocyte antigens. Half of the DNA-immunized pigs were fully protected upon viral challenge, while the remaining animals were partially protected, showing a delayed, shorter and milder disease than control pigs. Full protection in a given vaccinated-pig correlated with the induction of specific IFNγ-secreting T-cells, detectable prior to FMDV-challenge, together with a rapid development of neutralizing antibodies after viral challenge, pointing towards the relevance that both arms of the immune response can play in protection. Our results open new avenues for developing future FMDV subunit vaccines. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)359-363
    JournalAntiviral Research
    Volume92
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2011

    Keywords

    • DNA vaccine
    • FMDV
    • Neutralizing antibody
    • ScFv
    • T-cell

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'A DNA vaccine encoding foot-and-mouth disease virus B and T-cell epitopes targeted to class II swine leukocyte antigens protects pigs against viral challenge'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this