A cross-cultural study of possible iatrogenic effects of gifted education programs: tenth graders’ perceptions of academically high performing classmates

Hyerim Oh, Margaret Sutherland, Niamh Stack, Maria del Mar Badia Martín, Sheyla Blumen, Quoc Anh Thu Nguyen, Catherine Wormald, Julie Maakrun, Albert Ziegler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 European Council for High Ability. Previous empirical studies have yielded inconclusive results about peer perceptions of academically high performing students. The purpose of this study was to investigate students’ perceptions of the intellectual ability, positive social qualities, and popularity of a hypothetical new high performing classmate. Participants were 1060 Vietnamese, South Korean, British, Australian, Peruvian, and Spanish boys and girls in 10th grade. The results revealed that the perceptions of academically high performing classmates differed by country group. Positive perceptions of intellectual ability and social qualities were commonly found in all countries except the two Asian countries (Vietnam and South Korea), where the students reported more neutral views of high performers. In conclusion, it is argued that there is no evidence for possible iatrogenic effects of gifted education programs aiming at high achievements
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)152-166
JournalHigh Ability Studies
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • cross-cultural study
  • high performer
  • iatrogenesis
  • intellectual ability
  • peer perceptions
  • popularity
  • social qualities

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