A comparative study of personality descriptors attributed to the deaf, the blind, and individuals with no sensory disability

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    Abstract

    During the building of self-concept, one's self-perception is influenced by the attitudes and levels of acceptance of significant individuals in one's immediate environment and in society as a whole. This study explores the social image of the deaf, beginning with an analysis of personality characteristics attributed to this group. The resulting profile is then compared to those of two other previously assessed groups: the blind and those with no sensory disability. A sample of 222 university students evaluated personality descriptors as applied to the three groups by means of a semantic differential. For certain personality descriptors, the students had different impressions of the three groups. Results show that certain negative stereotypes still mark the social representation of deafness. Instances of familiarity or friendship between baring people and deaf people serve generally to mitigate such stereotypes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)24-28
    JournalAmerican Annals of the Deaf
    Volume141
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 1996

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