The impact of urban form and spatial structure on per capita carbon footprint in U.S. larger metropolitan areas

Ivan Muñiz, Andres Dominguez

Producció científica: Contribució a una revistaArticleRecercaAvaluat per experts

26 Cites (Scopus)

Resum

Different studies have estimated cities' contribution to total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at between forty and seventy percent. According to the so-called Compact City Approach, high density and centrality should lead to low GHG. This study compares the effect of the urban density and spatial structure (monocentrism, polycentrism, and dispersion) of the main U.S. cities on their greenhouse gas emissions from mobility and housing. The estimated models include control variables in order to improve the statistical adjustment, these variables are grouped into three categories: basic controls as temperature and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); historical-demographic controls since 1900; and geographic-urban planning controls. The results detect an environmentally positive effect, albeit a moderate one, associated with monocentric and polycentric spatial structures as compared to dispersed structures. Within the tradition of urban planning, these results can be used as an argument to stop the dispersed decentralization of cities. However, the efficacy of some policies encouraging density should be accompanied by specific policies which increase the energy efficiency of housing and promote the use of public transport.
Idioma originalEnglish
Pàgines (de-a)0001-19
Nombre de pàgines19
RevistaSustainability
Volum12
DOIs
Estat de la publicacióPublicada - 2020

Fingerprint

Navegar pels temes de recerca de 'The impact of urban form and spatial structure on per capita carbon footprint in U.S. larger metropolitan areas'. Junts formen un fingerprint únic.

Com citar-ho